Business and employees

Last update: 05 Jun 2020 4:55pm

Businesses, places and services that are closed or open (with restrictions) as of Friday 5 June 2020

The Tasmanian Government is gradually easing restrictions on businesses as part of it's response to COVID-19.

Businesses and workplaces are required to develop a COVID Safe Workplace Plan, before reopening or expanding their current business model in line with the easing of restrictions.

See more information on restrictions and the development of COVID Safe Workplace Plans.

NOTE:
Maximum density limits apply to businesses/activities outside households. Read more information about how the 4 square metre rule is used to determine density.
Where practicable, business operators, staff, volunteers and attendees should maintain a distance of 1.5m from other people. Read more about physical distancing.
Attendee numbers do not include staff or volunteers, but do include children and babies.

Restaurants and cafes (in all settings including pubs, clubs, hotels, RSLs and sports clubs)

  • Can serve food and/or drinks to up to 40 seated patrons.
  • Each setting where dining occurs must not have a density of seated patrons greater than 1 per 4 square metres. Read about density limits.
  • The restriction on the number of diners applies to the venue as a whole regardless of whether the venue has multiple separate dining rooms.
  • Restaurants may continue to offer delivery and takeaway services. For restaurants and cafes doing seated meals and takeaway, the takeaway customers can be in addition to the 40 seated customers (depending on size).
  • Contact details for the person who made the booking or at least one diner from a walk-in group should be recorded for future contact tracing if needed. It is not necessary to collect the details of people visiting the premises to collect takeaway food or drinks.

Food courts and food vans

  • Food courts are allowed to provide takeaway services only.
  • Mobile food vans cannot operate at markets but can sell takeaway at locations consistent with their permits.

Pubs, clubs and bars

  • Can service food and/or drinks to up to 40 seated patrons at pubs, clubs, bars, RSLs and community clubs.
  • Betting services and TASKeno may operate within venues. Gaming areas (electronic gaming machines) must remain closed.
  • Casinos and nightclubs remain closed, except for cafes, bars restaurants within these venues.

Betting shopfronts

  • Up to 20 people in TAB retail outlets

Accommodation services

Includes hotels, motels, hostels and guest houses, caravan parks (including cabin type accommodation), bed and breakfasts, and short-stay accommodation (eg. Airbnbs).

  • Overnight stays permitted with no limit on the number of guests, apart from rented holiday houses/short-stay accommodation, which are limited to 20 attendees and subject to density limits.
  • For caravan and camping parks, booked sites must not exceed the maximum density limit for that site, unless those camping are all from the same household.
  • Guests may have visitors to their accommodation area, as long as the density rules are applied.
  • Gathering limits and the one person per 4 square metres rule do apply to common areas but do not apply to people in rooms. Read more information about density and gatherings.

Multi-purpose venues

Multi-purpose venues that are used for accommodation and entertainment purposes:

  • All separate areas of the venue must operate according to the restrictions that apply to those premises (eg café, bar, accommodation).
  • Gatherings in communal areas are restricted to 20 people (excluding staff) and the 4 square metre rule per person applies.
  • Facilities such as swimming pools are permitted but saunas and spas baths must remain closed.

Indoor and outdoor gyms, fitness centres and sporting venues

Includes boot camps, yoga, barre, health clubs, gymnastics and cheerleading facilities, wellness centres and fitness classes.

  • Up to 20 attendees, regardless of whether there are multiple spaces.
  • At least one employee must be on premises during operating hours.
  • Toilets open; communal shower and change room facilities closed.

Read more information about sport and recreation.

Dance schools

  • Up to 20 attendees.
  • Dance activities should not involve close or direct contact between people.
  • Toilets open; communal shower and change room facilities closed.
  • No spectators other than one parent or carer per child.

Swimming pools

  • Up to 20 people per pool at any one time.
  • Applies to indoor and outdoor pools, including therapy pools.
  • No spectators other than one parent or carer per child, or if a person with a disability needs one or more people to help to use a pool. If carers are in the pool, they are counted in the gathering number.
  • Toilets open; communal shower and change room facilities closed.

Beauty and personal care services

Includes beauty therapy, massage, facials, tanning, waxing, manicure or other nail treatments, ear and body piercing, tattoos, body modification and day spas.

  • Gathering restrictions do not apply, but the one person per four square metre rule does apply.

Real estate and auction houses

  • Up to 20 attendees (not including staff) at indoor and outdoor open homes and auctions, both real estate and other auctions.
  • No gathering limits for auction houses that sell livestock, food or other agricultural purposes.

Markets

  • Fresh produce and farmers markets are permitted. All other indoor and outdoor markets remain closed.

Transport

Events

  • Up to 40 attendees at religious gatherings, ceremonies and instruction; non-denominational ceremonies; and similar services.
  • Up to 40 attendees at weddings, not including the couple being married and staff and volunteers facilitating the event.
  • Up to 50 attendees at funerals, not including staff and volunteers facilitating the event.

Home-based businesses

  • Home-based businesses can continue to operate if the service itself is not restricted.
  • For a business operating from a residential premises, there should be no more than 10 attendees on the premises (not including members of the household).

Outdoor amusement parks and arcades

  • Up to 20 attendees.
  • Operators must manage the movement of people in and out of the premises to meet density and physical distancing requirements.

Museums, national institutions, historic sites and galleries

  • Up to 80 attendees in public areas.
  • Operators should, where practicable, ensure there is separation between attendees as they enter and exit and use foyers and lobbies.

Cinemas

  • Up to 40 attendees in each single cinema.
  • Operators should, where practicable, ensure there is separation between attendees as they enter and exit and use foyers and lobbies.

Concert and performance venues, arenas and auditoriums

  • Up to 40 attendees in each public area of the premises.
  • Operators should, where practicable, ensure there is separation between attendees as they enter and exit and use foyers and lobbies.
  • If the venue is used for live performance, the total number of performers and support staff (not including front-of-house staff but including paid and unpaid staff) must not exceed 20 people or the maximum capacity of the backstage area according to the density limits. Read more about density.

Zoos and wildlife parks

  • Up to 40 attendees

Community facilities or events

  • Indoor or outdoor markets, unless the market is for the provision of fresh food or produce only, and the food is to be consumed elsewhere (and not at the market)
  • Garage and car boot sales or other similar means of selling second hand goods, other than a tip shop or charity store

Food and beverage

  • A market that is not a fresh food or produce market (eg a street food market, or a market selling other goods or services)
  • Food courts (except for takeaways)

Entertainment and events

  • Casinos and gaming venues
  • Indoor play centres
  • Indoor amusement parks and arcades
  • Large outdoor events, such as concerts, fairs and shows
  • Dance venues and nightclubs
  • Strip clubs and sex services (these services are not permitted to operate or place advertisements in local newspapers)
  • Horse racing and greyhound racing (restarts 13 June 2020)

Beauty and personal care

  • Saunas, spa baths, flotation tanks and bath houses (including water-based spas)

Sport and recreation

  • No competitive sport is permitted – only training.

Last update: 21 May 2020 3:43pm

Financial support

State Government financial support

The Tasmanian Government is providing further support and economic stimulus to help businesses affected by COVID-19. See Stimulus and support for more information.

Australian Government financial support

Information about Australian Government support for businesses is available on the Treasury website.

Where to get help

National Debt Helpline

The National Debt Helpline's (1800 007 007) financial counsellors provide free, independent and confidential advice to help you manage your debts or negotiate with creditors. The National Debt Helpline website also has step-by-step guides and useful information on how to deal with specific types of debts.

Business Tasmania

If your business has been impacted by coronavirus, you are encouraged to contact Business Tasmania on 1800 440 026 to discuss your situation and register your impact. You can also fill out the online form on the Business Tasmania website.

Tourism Tasmania

Information for Tasmanian tourism operators is available on the Tourism Tasmania website.

Last update: 14 Apr 2020 5:06pm

This information has been developed to assist commercial tenants and landlords to understand changes to commercial tenancies as a result of COVID-19 emergency.

On 9 April 2020, the Premier issued a Notice under section 22 of the COVID-19 Disease Emergency (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 2020.

Immediate halt to terminations for unpaid rent or other moneys for certain commercial tenants

A landlord cannot terminate a commercial lease for unpaid rent or other moneys with a tenant that has business turnover of less than $50 million where that business is also eligible for the Commonwealth Government’s JobKeeper program.

This applies to any commercial lease that was in place at 1 February 2020 or which commenced prior to 9 April 2020 and will be in place until at least 30 September 2020.

Immediate suspension of rent increases (except for turnover rents) for certain commercial tenants

A landlord cannot increase the rent of a commercial tenant with a business turnover of less than $50 million where that business is also eligible for the Commonwealth Government’s JobKeeper program.

The only exception to this is for leases where rent payable is linked to the turnover of the tenant.

This applies to any commercial lease that was in place at 1 February 2020 or which commenced prior to 9 April 2020 and will be in place until at least 30 September 2020.

Introduction of a Code of Conduct for commercial tenancies

The Tasmanian Government will introduce legislation to give effect to the Code of Conduct for commercial tenancies announced by the Prime Minister on 7 April 2020.

A key principle of the Code of Conduct is that loss associated with the reduction of turnover experienced by tenants should be shared between tenants and landlords.

The Code of Conduct outlines how commercial tenants and landlords will work together during the period it is in effect. This will be until 30 September 2020 and can be extended if necessary.

The Code of Conduct will:

  • prevent termination for unpaid rents and rent increases
  • allow for the waiver or deferral of rent and other charges, and
  • ensures that relief provided by Government and financial institutions is shared by the parties.

The Code of Conduct will be supported by mediation arrangements.

For further information contact the Consumer, Building and Occupational Services on 1300 654 499.

Last update: 05 Jun 2020 4:42pm

The Government has a plan to ‘Rebuild a Stronger Tasmania’. As part of this plan, all workplaces that are reopening will be required to have a COVID-19 Safety Plan that complies with minimum COVID-19 safety standards. Workplaces that have continued to operate should consider completing a safety plan by 15 June 2020. Minimum Standards will be introduced by 15 June 2020.

Templates are available below to support small and medium-sized businesses to assist in the development of COVID-19 Safety Plans based on sector-specific guidelines. Developing a COVID-19 Safety Plan is the best way to demonstrate compliance with the Minimum Standards.

As workplaces reopen, they will need to demonstrate their compliance with the Minimum Standards. A timeline for reopening workplaces provides a guide on when business will be allowed to reopen. Funerals and churches wanting to have funeral services of up to 20 people from 11 May 2020 will need a COVID-19 Safety Plan. While it is recommended for funerals under 10 to have a COVID-19 Safety Plan in place, it is not a requirement from Monday 11 May 2020.

From the 15 June 2020, all funerals will be required to have a COVID-19 Safety Plan. Similarly, restaurants and cafes in all settings, community and local government facilities and libraries from 18 May 2020 will also need a COVID-19 Safety Plan.

There are Public Health Orders in place that require current workplaces to comply with many of the Minimum Standards. All workplaces must comply from 15 June 2020.

Business are encouraged to register for COVID Ready window stickers and posters once their COVID-19 Safety Plan is developed and in place.This sticker or poster will provide the Tasmanian community with confidence that your workplace is best prepared to manage and respond to COVID-19.

COVID-19 Safe Workplaces Framework

The COVID-19 Safe Workplaces Framework supports businesses and workplaces in Tasmania to continue to operate, or reopen, while protecting Tasmania's health and safety during the COVID-19 pandemic. The Framework is made up of three key parts:

  • Minimum Standards to manage the ongoing risk of COVID-19 in workplaces.
  • COVID-19 Safe Workplace Guidelines to provide more detail on how sectors and workplaces can meet the Minimum Standards.
  • COVID-19 Safety Plans to outline how each workplace complies with the Minimum Standards.

Minimum Standards

Minimum Standards for managing the risks of COVID-19 in all workplaces will be introduced by 15 June 2020. The Minimum Standards have been developed in consultation with WorkSafe Tasmania and Public Health and will be in place for 6 months, but may be extended if necessary.

The Minimum Standards require all workplaces to:

  • Manage the risks of a person contracting or spreading COVID-19 in the workplace
  • Implement and maintain a cleaning schedule across the workplace
  • Have good hygiene procedures and practices (such as washing and/or sanitising of hands)
  • Ensure workers who have been instructed to quarantine or self-isolate don’t come to the workplace
  • Make sure physical distancing requirements are met by workers, contractors and other people entering, leaving or moving around the workplace.
  • Provide information, training and supervision on how the risks of COVID-19 are to be managed and ensure all processes and procedures are applied by workers.
  • Provide information and instruction to other people who attend the workplace about how they are to comply with your processes and procedures, and make sure they apply them.

You are required to be able to demonstrate how you are complying with the Minimum Standards, if asked by a workplace inspector. Developing a COVID-19 Safety Plan is the best way to demonstrate compliance with the Minimum Standards.

You will also need to be able to show any processes or procedures you have put in place to implement your plan. The workplace inspector may check that your plan and procedures are being applied in the workplace.

While it is up to individual businesses to determine how best to manage COVID-19 risks in their workplace, please note that it is an offence under the Privacy Act 1988 to refuse a person access to a business or premises that is otherwise accessible to the public on the basis of whether or not they have the COVIDsafe app installed on their mobile device.

COVID-19 Safe Workplace Guidelines

We understand that one size doesn’t fit all. Safe Workplace Guidelines are being developed through consultation with industry sectors as a practical guide on how your workplace can meet the Minimum Standards.

WorkSafe Tasmania has a list of completed Sector Guidelines and targeted complete dates for the remaining sectors. Guidelines can also be downloaded from www.worksafe.tas.gov.au once available.

COVID-19 Safety Plans

Your COVID-19 Safety Plan will depend on the size and nature of your workplace. The person controlling the workplace has the duty to manage the risks in the workplace. They should decide how best to developed a COVID-19 Safety Plan. See the Common work health and safety terms.

Workplace toolbox and resources

Checklists and templates are available to help you develop your workplace COVID-19 Safety Plans. These will provide businesses and workplaces already operating, or those preparing to reopen when safe, a chance to review existing practices and prepare themselves for when restrictions are relaxed.

  • Checklist – how to keep your workers safe and limit the spread of COVID-19 and to help you to start thinking about measures to include in your COVID-19 Safety Plan.
  • Safe Workplace Guidelines – practical guides on how your business can meet the Minimum Standards will be available from www.worksafe.tas.gov.au as they are developed.
  • COVID-19 Safety Plan Template for Small Businesses – a practical step-by-step guide to completing a COVID-19 Safety Plan.
  • COVID-19 Safety Plan Template for Medium-Sized Businesses – This template provides a broader framework for developing COVID-19 Safety Plans and can be used by any workplace that wants greater flexibility in the process of drafting the COVID-19 Safety-Plan. Businesses that are already working to an industry standard for managing COVID-19 may find it easier to use the template for Medium-Sized Businesses. Large enterprises may already have well developed COVID-19 Plans in place for a range of workplaces. Existing plans need to be reviewed to ensure that meet the Minimum Standards.
  • How to make a COVID-19 Safety Plan - An online session from Business Tasmania to help you navigate the process of developing your COVID-19 Safety Plan.
  • COVID Ready Stickers and Posters – Stickers and Posters are available to promote the existence in your workplace of a COVID-19 Safety Plan.  This is not a Government endorsement or accreditation of your plan. It does, however, help workplaces to communicate with workers and customers that measures are in place to increase their health and safety during the COVID-19 pandemic. You will need to provide your ABN (if available) and declare that you understand your obligations and have a COVID-19 Safety Plan in place in your workplace. Register for a COVID Ready Stickers and Posters here.
  • Fact Sheet – An overview of COVID-19 Safety Plans.

For any queries

Visit WorkSafe Tasmania
Contact the Business Tasmania Hotline on 1800 440 026

Last update: 27 May 2020 4:22pm

I’ve been sick and have recovered but my boss won’t let me return to work

You can complete a Statutory Declaration stating you are ready to return to work.

My workplace is re-opening. Do I need to be tested for COVID-19 or get medical clearance to return to work?

If you are well and have not had COVID-19

No. If you are well and have not had COVID-19, there is no need to be tested or get medically cleared for COVID-19 before return to work unless this is directed by Public Health Services.

If you are unwell or have symptoms of COVID-19

Yes. If you have a fever (or signs of fever eg night sweats, chills) or cough, sore throat, runny nose or shortness of breath, even if its mild, it is important to get tested.

Stay away from work and other public places and get tested as soon as possible by phoning your GP or the Public Health Hotline (1800 671 738). Other than to get tested or for urgent medical care, stay at home until you get your test results. Even if the test result is negative, stay at home until you are well.

Get tested every time you get sick with any of these symptoms, even if you’ve had a negative test result before.

For staff who have tested positive for COVID-19

You do not need to be tested unless directed to by Public Health Services.

If you have tested positive for COVID-19, you must stay at home (or your place of isolation) until you receive a letter from Public Health Services stating you can leave isolation and return to normal duties, including work. You can only leave home (or your place of isolation) to access urgent, arranged medical care.

Does the quarantine period apply to travel by Fly in Fly out (FIFO) workers?

If you are a Tasmanian resident returning to Tasmania for a period of leave from work interstate, you may quarantine at your residence.

If you are required to leave Tasmania to return to work before the end of your 14 day quarantine period, you may do so, but must:

  • Transit directly from your residence to the port of departure; and
  • Maintain hand hygiene and physical distancing during transit

If you are travelling to Tasmania for work, you may be exempt from completing a period of quarantine as a Specified Person (Essential Traveller).

Does the quarantine period apply to commercial fishers and recreational boaters?

Commercial fishers and recreational boaters do not need to quarantine if they have not set foot interstate or overseas, and have not taken on crew from interstate and overseas in the past 14 days. See Coming to Tasmania for more information.

Does the quarantine period apply to maritime crew?

The State Controller offers the following class exemptions to eligible maritime crew from being required to quarantine in a government facility for a period of 14 days:

  • Class I: Maritime crew ‘signing-off’ a commercial or government vessel in Tasmania.
  • Class II: Maritime crew arriving in Tasmania to join a commercial or government vessel.
  • Class III: Maritime crew who are Tasmanian residents returning after disembarking at an interstate port.

These class exemptions are available to maritime crew of commercial and government vessels who are not eligible for the Category 3 exemption of the Schedule of Specified Persons. These exemptions do not apply to crew of cruise ships.

See Maritime crew for more information.

Advice for fruit pickers, working backpackers and transient workers

Fruit pickers and working backpackers may stay at commercial accommodation for the purposes of employment for the duration of their working arrangement, and may travel for the purposes of moving to and from work and other essential matters (such as purchasing food essential supplies, attending medical appointments). See Accommodation and leaving Tasmania for more information.

Rights at work

Where can I get information about my rights at work, eg being made to use annual/personal leave, being stood down, or being ordered to work from home?

Long service leave

Who can I talk to about accessing my long service leave, or being made to take it?

  • Private sector workers: if you are covered by the Long Service Leave Act 1976 (you can check this with Fair Work; see details above) then the WorkSafe Tasmania Helpline can provide advice. Complete WorkSafe Tasmania’s general enquiry form. Make sure you provide a contact number as the Helpline may need to contact you to discuss. Or call the Helpline on 1300 366 322.
  • Construction Industry workers: contact TasBuild online or call 6294 0807.
  • State Service workers: discuss with your HR team, your union, or the WorkSafe Tasmania Helpline on 1300 366 322.

Superannuation

Who can tell me about accessing my superannuation under 'hardship' circumstances?

Financial assistance

Where can I find the information about financial assistance that is available for workers who have been laid off or stood down?

Workers compensation

Who can help me with my workers compensation claim issues?

Work health and safety

Where can I find information about being COVID-19 safe at work, including information specific to my industry?

Last update: 27 May 2020 4:21pm

All employers

What should I tell my staff?

Employers should provide information and brief all employees and contract staff, including domestic and cleaning staff.

Key information to share includes:

My business is re-opening. Should my staff get tested or medically cleared before returning to work?

For staff who are well and have not had COVID-19

No. There is no need for staff who are well and have not had COVID-19 to be tested or medically cleared for COVID-19 before returning to work, unless this is directed by Public Health Services.

Taking steps to slow the spread of illness including through handwashing and physical distancing is important. For more information, see the COVID-19 Safe Workplaces Framework.

For staff who have symptoms of COVID-19

Yes. For staff who have a fever (or signs of fever eg night sweats, chills) or cough, sore throat, runny nose or shortness of breath, even mild, it’s important to get tested.

These staff should stay away from work and other public places and get tested as soon as possible by phoning their GP or the Public Health Hotline (1800 671 738). Other than to get tested or for urgent medical care, they should stay at home until test results are known. Even if test results are negative, encourage staff who are unwell to stay at home until they are well.

For staff who have tested positive for COVID-19

Staff who have tested positive to COVID-19 will receive a letter from Public Health Services telling them when they can leave isolation and return to normal duties, including work.

Can staff who have travelled go to work?

All non-essential travellers arriving in Tasmania will be required to quarantine for 14 days. If they do not get sick in that time, they can then return to work and normal duties. They do not need a clearance certificate.

Employees who are in quarantine should alert their employer. Depending on the type of work, and provided the employee is well, they may want to discuss alternative arrangements such as working from home.

Are my staff Essential Travellers?

See Essential Travellers for more information.

General workplace cleaning

The following information is about general workplace cleaning; not for healthcare settings and confirmed cases.

Cleaning is an important way to slow the spread of viruses like the one that causes COVID-19.

For frequently touched surfaces like door handles, tabletops, desks, light switches, railings, shared keyboards and mice, taps and handles:

  • Clean these surfaces frequently, making sure you remove any visible dirt and organic matter so that the disinfectant can work well.
  • Regularly wipe the surface using your normal household or workplace detergent/disinfectant, following the instructions on the label.
  • It’s okay to use detergent wipes, as long as the cleaning process is thorough and removes visible dirt/organic matter.

Surfaces that are less often touched:

  • Clean these surfaces at least when they start to look dusty or dirty and immediately after any spillage or contamination.
  • Use your normal household or workplace detergent, following the instructions on the label.
  • It’s okay to use detergent wipes, as long as the cleaning process is thorough and removes visible dirt/organic matter.
  • Damp mopping is better than dry.

Tourism operators

Support for cancelled bookings

If your business has been impacted by cancellations both now and in forward bookings due to the coronavirus, you are encouraged to contact Business Tasmania on 1800 440 026 to discuss your situation and register your impact.

Information for Tasmanian tourism operators including business assistance information is also available on the Tourism Tasmania website.

Advice for travel, transport and hotel industries

The Australian Government Department of Health has issued a fact sheet for Hotel Management and Hotel Staff about preventive action staff and guests should take. There are also other resources for people in the travel, transport and hotel industries.

For more resources specific to tourism in Tasmania, see the Tourism Tasmania website.

Hire car businesses

Hire car companies are encouraged to support the implementation of the current quarantine actions to support community safety especially when it is clear the use of their vehicles is contrary to current health directions. The following advice is provided by Department of State Growth to support this decision making by operators:

  • Hire and drive accreditation does not place a positive obligation on an operator to hire a vehicle.
  • Refusal to accept a hirer will only be an offence if the refusal is due to grounds established under anti-discrimination legislation.
  • There are no measures that the Transport Commission would invoke against a hire and drive operator for refusing a hirer who is required to be in quarantine.

State Growth are encouraging industry to work with travellers who may need to get to place of quarantine whilst reinforcing industry standard cleaning procedures.

State Growth will be providing information directly to operators to confirm these details.

Building and construction

Building and construction remains an essential activity under Public Health guidelines. The Government asks that all those involved in the sector - businesses, contractors and employees - have a strong focus on measures to minimise risk of contracting COVID-19.

WorkSafe Tasmania provides links to COVID-19 health and safety resources including industry specific resources for those working on and around building and construction sites.

Primary producers and processors

Ensuring food produced in Tasmania's primary production and processing sectors is safe to eat is an important step in ensuring the wellbeing of consumers. It is also important to the protection of Tasmania's reputation as a producer of safe and clean food.

To help slow the spread of coronavirus, it is important that Tasmania’s primary production and processing sectors comply with their obligations to enforce physical distancing and maintain good hygiene practices.

Biosecurity Tasmania has developed a factsheet to support primary producers and processors that provides advice on ensuring good food safety practices and plans during the COVID-19 pandemic.

To find out more, see the Biosecurity Tasmania section on DPIPWE's COVID-19 Response page.

Does the quarantine period apply to maritime crew?

The State Controller offers the following class exemptions to eligible maritime crew from being required to quarantine in a government facility for a period of 14 days:

  • Class I: Maritime crew ‘signing-off’ a commercial or government vessel in Tasmania.
  • Class II: Maritime crew arriving in Tasmania to join a commercial or government vessel.
  • Class III: Maritime crew who are Tasmanian residents returning after disembarking at an interstate port.

These class exemptions are available to maritime crew of commercial and government vessels who are not eligible for the Category 3 exemption of the Schedule of Specified Persons. These exemptions do not apply to crew of cruise ships.

See Maritime crew for more information.

Last update: 19 May 2020 10:22am

To help stop the spread of coronavirus, it is important that all retail businesses comply with their obligations to enforce physical distancing and maintain good hygiene practices.

The Tasmanian Government’s announcement of easing COVID-19 restrictions includes the requirement for businesses and workplaces to develop a COVID-19 Safety Plan, before reopening or expanding their current business model in line with the easing of restrictions.

More information, checklists and templates are available to assist you develop your COVID-19 Safety Plans.

Guidance for permitted businesses

The following guidelines are intended to assist retail businesses to meet their obligations with regard to the current restrictions that have been put in place based on health advice.

Each business will need to adapt these suggestions to best suit their own environment, taking into account size, layout and customer behaviour.

Customer numbers

To ensure physical distancing can be maintained:

  • Limit the number of customers entering the store – the total number of people in your store, at any one time, including staff and customers, should not exceed one person for every four square metres. Read about how to apply this rule.
  • Where safe and practical, each person should maintain a distance of no less than 1.5 metres between every other person.
  • Make sure you have a plan that details the maximum number of people for each undivided area. Consider specific limits on the number of people for each aisle within the store.
  • Place a staff member at the entrance to the store to count customers entering and leaving the store and to manage a ‘one in one out’ policy where needed. For smaller stores consider alternative strategies to controlling the numbers in the store, or a closed door with appointments.
  • Consider one-way aisles to make these limits easier for everyone to comply with.
  • Where possible, consider limiting the number of available carparks to align with the person limit in your store, but still maintain access to disability parking spaces.

Queuing

To maintain physical distancing, place appropriately spaced floor markings at queuing points, such as checkouts and the entrance to the store. At larger stores, queuing stations need to be clearly identified outside the store.

Security

For larger retail stores, appropriate security measures could be put in place to ensure compliance with physical distancing obligations. Smaller retailers may consider similar measures, depending on the layout of their store.

Staff also have a key role to play in monitoring the behaviour of customers and ensuring measures put in place to achieve appropriate physical distancing are followed.

Communication

Provide clear signage to:

  • Advise unwell customers, contractors and delivery staff not to enter the premises.
  • State the maximum number of customers/staff/ contractors allowed in the store and in each aisle, including floor plans of the store.
  • Remind customers of physical distancing requirements.
  • Remind all people in the store of appropriate hygiene requirements.
  • Request customers use cashless payment methods.

For larger stores, consider including these messages in your store announcements.

Practical measures

  • Encourage your customers to use cashless payments when possible to minimise contact.
  • Increase support for online shopping and delivery services to lessen demand on in-store services.
  • Re-arrange stock where possible to improve customer flow and minimise congregating.
  • Where practical, move staff to night-fill to reduce numbers of people in store.
  • Consider how your product limits apply to customers with very large families.
  • Where alternate entries are closed, ensure fire and emergency egress are maintained.
  • If the number of carpark spaces is reduced to ensure physical distancing requirements, consider the need for traffic management as required.
  • Consider a dedicated hour of shopping for elderly customers, those in need of assistance, as well as carers, friends and neighbours who shop on behalf of vulnerable customers.
  • Finally, remind customers to be tolerant, kind and patient with staff and other customers. These changes will cause inconveniences, but they are necessary to keep us all safe.

Cleaning, hygiene and infection control

  • Ensure unwell staff do not come to work.
  • Encourage staff to wash their hands frequently and thoroughly with soap and warm water, and dry them.
  • Provide hand sanitiser for customer use in clearly accessible locations, including at the entrance to the store.
  • Regularly clean frequently touched surfaces such as trolleys, shopping baskets and counters.
  • Use a tissue (or the inside of your elbow) to cover coughs or sneezes and dispose of the tissue in the rubbish bin straight after use.

Last update: 07 May 2020 9:03am

You cannot go to work as a healthcare worker if:

  • you have direct patient contact AND you develop a fever (≥38°C) or history of fever (eg night sweats, chills) OR an acute respiratory infection (eg shortness of breath, cough, sore throat); you fit the definition of a suspect case of COVID-19 and need to be tested*
  • you meet any criteria for quarantine and have not been given exemption from quarantine to attend work; you need to stay at home
  • you had unprotected close contact with a confirmed case in the last 14 days^; you need to quarantine for 14 days from your last contact with the confirmed case.

*This does not include contact you may have with confirmed cases while using recommended personal protective equipment and infection control measures as part of your work.

^Early detection of COVID-19 in healthcare workers is an important protective mechanism for the higher risk population that we care for. For this reason, healthcare workers that provide direct care have a lower threshold for being a suspect case.

If you need to stay away from work but cannot do this in your own home, you may be eligible for emergency accommodation.

For more information for health and aged care workers head to the Resources page.

Last update: 03 Jun 2020 2:49pm

Employers must ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, the health and safety of workers and other people. This includes having measures in place to eliminate or manage the risks arising from COVID-19.

To do this WorkSafe Tasmania advises:

  • to keep up to date with Tasmanian Government advice on controls to prevent the spread of COVID-19, including any restrictions on normal business activities, and respond accordingly
  • if there has been a confirmed case of COVID-19 in your place of business, you should seek advice from Public Health Services by calling the Public Health Hotline on 1800 671 738
  • if Public Health Services becomes aware of a positive diagnosis, it has procedures in place to track the movements of the person and will provide advice on what action should be taken
  • current legislative requirements remain in force; however, if you are unable to meet your regulatory obligations because of COVID-19 then WorkSafe Tasmania will take a reasonable and proportionate response.

If employers need to make changes to usual working hours/days or systems of work, they must do a risk assessment and control any risks found. Issues that could arise include fatigue, work breaks, workers' training/skill levels, and providing information, training and supervision to insure workers' safety. WorkSafe Tasmania’s website has guidance on how to manage these issues.

The Tasmanian Government’s COVID-19 Safe Workplaces Framework supports workplaces as they re-open or expand their business activities during the pandemic, while ensuring the health and safety of all Tasmanians. WorkSafe  Tasmania have published a series of  COVID-19 Safe Workplace Guidelines. These will help you complete your COVID-19 Safety Plan.

For more COVID-19 specific guidance and resources — including workplace safety, pandemic planning, industry-specific guidance (including construction, retail, transport and more), working safely from home, and COVID-19 incident notification requirements — see WorkSafe Tasmania’s COVID-19 advice. Please check this website regularly for updates.

Workers compensation

Under the Workers Rehabilitation and Compensation Act, employers are required to pay compensation to a worker who has contracted COVID-19 and their employment contributed to this to a substantial degree. The issue is one of determining that the worker’s employment is the major or most significant factor in them contracting COVID-19.

For more COVID-19 specific guidance on workers compensation, for employers and workers, see WorkSafe Tasmania's website. Please check this website regularly for any updates.