Current restrictions

Tasmania has moved to Stage Three in the lifting of restrictions.

Below are the restrictions that apply during Stage Three of Tasmania's Roadmap to Recovery.

New online travel registration system

A new online travel registration system – G2G PASS – has been introduced for people wanting to travel to Tasmania.

Under the new system, all travellers need a QR code to enter Tasmania. Those who have been granted Essential Traveller status, for work or compassionate and medical grounds, prior to the launch of the new system need to reapply through G2G PASS.

Travellers who make their submission to travel to Tasmania and receive their G2G PASS QR code before travelling will be able to quickly pass through Tasmanian ports on arrival.

The border process will be delayed if you do not have your G2G PASS QR code when you arrive. Biosecurity Tasmania officers will ask you to register your travel on the G2G PASS website. If you are unable to complete the online application, Biosecurity Tasmania officers will be available to assist. You may have to quarantine until your application can be processed.

The G2G PASS replaces the existing paper-based and online processes, such as the Tasmanian Arrivals Form and online Essential Traveller application forms.

Read more about the G2G PASS.

Border restrictions

Border restrictions, including requirements to quarantine for people arriving in Tasmania, remain in place. Review the full Direction in relation to Persons Arriving in Tasmania and the Direction in relation to Persons Arriving in Tasmania from Affected Regions and Premises.

See Coming to Tasmania for more information.

Testing of Essential Travellers

Essential Travellers who have spent time in an affected regions (currently Victoria) or premises in the 14 days prior to their arrival in Tasmania are required to undertake a COVID-19 test and screening on arrival. See Essential Travellers for more information.

Quarantine fee

Non-Tasmanian and Tasmanian residents entering mandatory government-designated accommodation are required to pay a fee.

This applies to all non-essential travellers arriving in Tasmania who are required to undertake 14 days quarantine in Government–designated quarantine. This includes Tasmanian residents who have spent time in an affected region (currently Victoria) or an affected premises in the 14 days prior to arriving in Tasmania.

See Quarantine for more information.

The number of people permitted at businesses/activities (other than households) is now determined by the density of the area, up to a maximum of:

  • 250 people for an undivided space in an indoor premises; and
  • 500 people in an undivided space outdoors.

Maximum density limit is one person per 2 square metres.

Where the number of people permitted according to the density limit is less than the gathering limit, the lower number applies.

For more information, including exclusions, go to Business restrictions.

Gathering limits are now determined by the density of the area, up to a maximum of:

  • 250 people for an undivided space in an indoor premises; and
  • 500 people in an undivided space outdoors.

Maximum density limit is one person per 2 square metres.

Where the number of people permitted according to the density limit is less than the gathering limit, the lower number applies.

The maximum number of people permitted on a premises includes staff, volunteers, children and babies.

Where practicable, business operators, staff, volunteers and attendees should maintain a distance of 1.5 metres from other people.

Read more about Gatherings, density limits and physical distancing.

Gatherings at households – including shacks – are limited to up to 20 people at any one time, not including residents of the household.

You can travel and stay anywhere within Tasmania, but you must comply with the restrictions on gatherings and household visits.

You should continue to maintain physical distancing at all times when you are out (staying at least 1.5 metres from other people), wash your hands regularly and cover coughs and sneezes. You should not visit others or have visitors to your home if you are unwell.

Read more about Gatherings and physical distancing rules.

Gathering limits are now determined by the density of the area, up to a maximum of:

  • 250 people for an undivided space in an indoor premises; and
  • 500 people in an undivided space outdoors.

Maximum density limit is one person per 2 square metres.

Where the number of people permitted according to the density limit is less than the gathering limit, the lower number applies.

For sporting and recreation facilities with multiple indoor or outdoor spaces, the gathering cap applies separately to each single undivided space. For example, a multi-purpose sporting venue with multiple, separate, undivided indoor spaces, could have up to 250 people in each of these spaces (the density limit applies).

The maximum number of people permitted on a premises includes coaches, athletes, staff, volunteers, children and babies.

Sporting and gym facilities must ensure there is at least one staff member or other authorised person present to supervise the premises at all times while it is being used (creation and maintenance of a record is recommended).

Where practicable, attendees should maintain a distance of 1.5 metres from other people.

Sporting activities permitted based on Level C of the AIS Framework for Rebooting Sport, meaning the following are permitted:

  • full contact training
  • full competition sport (contact and non-contact)
  • sharing of equipment where necessary
  • use of change rooms and other shared facilities.

Larger teams should consider maintaining some small group separation at training and non-essential social gatherings should be limited.

Gathering limits and the requirement to maintain physical distancing where practical applies to all sports, exercise and recreation.

Read more about Sport and recreation.

Most parks and reserves (including visitor centres and campgrounds) are open to the public.

For more details visit the PWS website.

You are encouraged to continue to work from home if it works for you and your employer. For example, office workers should be encouraged to work from home to help with physical distancing measures and limit the contact between people.