Suitable premises quarantine (Home quarantine)

Last Updated: 14 Oct 2021 5:01pm

A suitable premises means:

  • a private residence
  • short-term rental accommodation where the person or family is/are the only occupants
  • or other premises approved by the Deputy State Controller or Director of Public Health

For more information see suitable premises.



When travelling to your premises to start quarantine, use private transport if you can, and go straight there, to protect others.

If another person collects you from the port/airport, please ensure you:  

  • minimise the number of people in the car – its best if it is just the driver and you
  • wear a face mask
  • wash your hands or use an alcohol-based hand sanitiser before getting in the car
  • avoid physical contact with the driver – consider sitting in the rear left seat
  • practice good hand hygiene, use a tissue (or flexed elbow if a tissue is not readily available) to cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze.

Your driver does not need to quarantine but should monitor themselves for any cold or flu-like symptoms. If they develop COVID-19 symptoms, they will need to isolate themselves and call the Public Health Hotline on 1800 671 738 to arrange a COVID-19 test.

If you need to use public transport (buses, taxis, ride-hail services), please ensure you:

  • wear a face mask
  • practice good hand hygiene and use a tissue (or flexed elbow if a tissue is not readily available) to cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze
  • minimise the number of surfaces you touch
  • wash your hands or use alcohol-based hand sanitiser before, during and after the journey, particularly if you sneeze, cough or blow your nose
  • try to maintain physical distance from others during transit, especially elderly people
  • where possible, avoid direct contact with other passengers and drivers.

It’s particularly important to protect people who are at higher risk of severe illness. That’s older people (people over the age of 70 years) and people with serious underlying health conditions like:

  • People on immune suppressive therapy following organ transplant
  • People who have had a bone marrow transplant in the last 24 months or are on immune suppressive therapy for graft vs host disease
  • People with blood cancers such as leukaemia, lymphoma or myelodysplastic syndrome diagnosed within the last five years
  • Those having chemotherapy or radiotherapy.

If you live with someone at risk of severe illness, it’s best if they live elsewhere while you are in quarantine. If that’s not feasible, keep as much distance as possible between yourself and them.

If you share your premises with others:

  • Try to stay away from shared spaces, like the kitchen and lounge room.
  • Wash and dry your hands often and well, with soap and water or alcohol-based hand rub.
  • Cover all coughs and sneezes. If you don’t have a tissue handy, use the inside of your elbow. Put used tissues in the rubbish straight away and wash your hands well.
  • Sleep in a separate bed and use a separate bathroom, if you can.
  • Keep personal items like towels, face washers and toothbrushes separate.
  • Do not share food or drinks.
  • Clean frequently touched surfaces (like door handles, sink taps and benches) in shared areas at least daily, using normal household detergent or disinfectant.
  • Wear a face mask if you need to be around other people at home.

If the person you live with who is in quarantine is well (i.e. does not have COVID-19 or symptoms of COVID-19), you are not required to quarantine.

Though you do not need to quarantine you should practice strict physical distancing at all times. Avoid contact with the person who is in quarantine. Keep at least 1.5 metres to two large steps away from the person quarantining. It is important that you also wash and dry your hands often, cover all coughs and sneezes with a tissue or the inside of your elbow and put used tissues in the rubbish straight after use.

If the quarantining person you live with gets sick and becomes a confirmed case of COVID-19, you will need to quarantine. The amount of time you will need to quarantine will depend on whether the confirmed case stays in your home while they are sick.

Remember, it is important that the person who is in quarantine remains in quarantine for the full amount of time they are directed to stay in quarantine, even if they feel well. Support them, where possible, for example provide-them meals in their room to minimise the possibility of contact in shared spaces.

Travellers quarantining at a suitable premise will be contacted on day 10 by Public Health Services and offered COVID-19 testing on day 12 of their quarantine period. If you develop any symptoms, you can request testing at any time by contacting the Public Health Hotline on 1800 671 738. Read more about COVID-19 testing.

If quarantining in an approved suitable premise you must remain in the premise for 14 days unless you need to leave the premises for the purpose of:

  • Obtaining medical care
  • In an emergency situation
  • For the purpose of leaving Tasmania
  • Permitted to leave by an authorised officer

If you need to access urgent healthcare that cannot be provided over the phone call an ambulance (000) and notify the operator of your quarantine status, or phone ahead to the facility if you are attending directly so they can prepare for your arrival.

If leaving for one of the above purposes, while outside of your residence you must:

  • Cover your mouth when coughing or sneezing;
  • Use disposable tissues and put used tissues in the bin straight after use;
  • Wash your  hands frequently and thoroughly with soap and running water or an alcohol-based hand sanitiser, especially after using a toilet, before and after eating and before and after returning from outdoors; and
  • Wear a face mask at all times when away from your approved suitable premise (exemptions can apply, see Schedule 2 in Directions in Relation to Persons Arriving in Tasmania for more details.

More details about these conditions are available in the Directions in Relation to Persons Arriving in Tasmania.

No, you must remain in or on your residence until your period of quarantine has ended. You must not change your address during your quarantine period, unless authorised.

Ask your child’s teachers to supply assignments, work sheets and homework by post or email, and if your child can join classes online.

Where possible, you should arrange for a friend or family member who is not in quarantine to transport your pet.

If your home needs urgent repairs while you’re in home quarantine, you can arrange that. However, you must take the following steps to protect the tradesperson:

  • Before the tradesperson arrives, tell them you are in home quarantine because you may have been exposed to coronavirus.
  • When the tradesperson is there, keep away. Everyone in the house should stay in another room or outside in your garden if possible. If you need to stay in the same room, keep as far away as possible. Practice good hygiene – use a tissue (or flexed elbow if a tissue is not readily available) to cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze, then put the tissue in the rubbish.
  • If the tradesperson is at risk of severe illness, they may refer you to an alternate provider.
  • Remind the tradesperson they must wash and dry their hands (or use alcohol-based hand rub if their hands do not look dirty) before entering and after leaving your home.
  • Remove clutter from the area the tradesperson needs to work.
  • Clean and disinfect all objects and surfaces (eg door handles, benches and sink taps) they may need to touch.
  • Wash your hands.
  • When the tradesperson is there, keep away. Everyone in the house should stay in another room or outside in your garden if possible. If you need to stay in the same room, keep as far away as possible. Practice good hygiene – use a tissue (or flexed elbow if a tissue is not readily available) to cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze, then put the tissue in the rubbish.

If you live with other people, you must be able to quarantine away from them. If you have to share facilities, or do not have your own bedroom and bathroom, you may be required to find other suitable premises, which could include a government-managed quarantine facility.

You must keep 1.5 metres away from all other people who you live with, and you must not have any visitors – even if they are in quarantine or isolation as well. You will be advised if the people you live with are also required to quarantine or isolate.

Let your family, friends and neighbours know you are in quarantine or isolation and tell them not to visit. Consider putting a note on your door to let people know that they cannot come inside to visit.

You must stay in quarantine for 14 nights to complete the full quarantine period unless otherwise directed.

Depending on your circumstances, the quarantine period commences:

  • from the date you arrived in Tasmania from a medium or high-risk area; or
  • from the date you identified you had spent time in a medium or high-risk premises; or
  • from the date you last had exposure to a confirmed case of COVID-19.

If you are completing your quarantine requirement in a suitable premises and you have complied with testing requirements that might apply to you, you can leave home on the 15th day of quarantine.

If you are required to have two tests, and have not been tested, you may be directed to quarantine for a further 10 days or until you undertake a COVID-19 test.

Public Health Services will contact you on day 10 to check if you have any symptoms.

If you develop any signs or symptoms of COVID-19 after leaving quarantine, you should call the Public Health Hotline on 1800 671 738 or your GP. Tell them about your symptoms and that you have recently been in quarantine.

While in quarantine or isolation, you can only leave that place:

  • to get tested for COVID-19
  • to access urgent healthcare that cannot be provided over the phone (if you are quarantining in suitable premises call an ambulance and notify the operator of your quarantine status or phone ahead to the facility if you are attending directly so they can prepare for your arrival)
  • in an emergency, including as directed by emergency services (police, fire, ambulance, SES)
  • to leave Tasmania (note – this does not apply to diagnosed cases or close contacts)
  • if permitted by an authorised officer.

What checks are conducted on compliance with quarantine requirements?

Tasmania Police are responsible for ensuring compliance with the quarantine directions.

Tasmania Police or another authorised officer may conduct compliance checks to ensure you are at the premises approved for your quarantine. This may be a physical check or via SMS.

SMS messages are sent via Whispir, a secure communications platform that is also used successfully by Tasmania Police for other communications tasks.

If you opt in via SMS, mobile phone location services will be used to pinpoint your location. You will not be live tracked - your location will be provided on a map image when you click on the link in the SMS.

Quarantine is very important to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in Tasmania. If you have been told to quarantine at home, you must do so. Breaching quarantine may incur jail time for up to six months or a monetary penalty of up to $16,800.

What do I do if I have concerns about non-compliance?

If you have information or concerns regarding non-compliance with quarantine requirements, you can report it by filling out this form.

Look after yourself and your mind

Being confined can cause boredom and stress. Look after yourself and others by:

  • Talking with family and friends.
  • Reflecting on how you have coped with difficult situations in the past and reassuring yourself that you will cope with this situation too. Remember that quarantine won’t last for long.
  • Exercising regularly. Consider exercise DVDs, dancing, floor exercises, yoga, walking around the backyard or using home exercise equipment. Physical activity is a great way to relieve stress and boredom and stay healthy.
  • Keeping in touch with family members and friends by telephone, email or social media.
  • Keeping up a normal daily routine as much as possible.
  • Working from home, if possible.

What to expect

  • Quarantine can affect people in different ways. You may experience:
  • Shock (feeling numb)
  • Body reactions (feeling sick)
  • Thoughts (feeling confused)
  • Emotions (fear/anger or sadness)
  • Behaviour (cannot sleep, changes to diet)
  • Attitudes (feelings of guilt or failure)
  • Social (avoiding people or needing to talk about it)

How to look after yourself

  • Keep in touch with people you trust via telephone, email or social media
  • Talk about it
  • Exercise indoors
  • Give yourself time
  • Try to relax
  • Breathe slowly
  • Remember that quarantine is temporary.

How to look after others

  • Listen to their worries, ask what is important to them
  • Reassure children using age-appropriate language
  • Offer to assist with simple things
  • Let them show their feelings
  • Give them time to adjust
  • Reassure them about safety and security
  • Remind them to eat.

You are not alone

Seek help if:

  • you are worried
  • you have no-one to talk to
  • your physical feelings worry you
  • you continue to feel upset.

Do not wait until you are not coping. For tips and strategies, visit Coping with Quarantine.