About COVID-19 vaccines

Last Updated: 04 Oct 2022 2:02pm

COVID-19 vaccines in Tasmania

Everyone living in Tasmania aged 5 years and over is eligible for a free COVID-19 vaccine. Eligible children aged 6 months to under 5 years with medical conditions that increase the risk of severe COVID-19 can now get vaccinated.



Age you can get vaccine

When you should get your second dose

Children aged 5 to 11 years

  • 8 weeks after first dose
  • Recommended to wait 3 months after a confirmed COVID-19 infection before receiving next COVID-19 vaccine dose
  • Next scheduled dose should be given as soon as possible after this period
  • Longer gap between infection and vaccination is likely to lead to a longer period of protection from reinfection

When you can get a third (booster) dose

Where to get it

Third (booster) dose not recommended

GP or select pharmacies

Age you can get vaccine

When you should get your second dose

People aged 12 years and over

  • Everyone 16+ is eligible for a third (booster) dose 3 months after their last dose
  • People aged 12-15 years who have completed a primary vaccination course 3 months ago, who:
    • are severely immunocompromised
    • have a disability with significant or complex health needs
    • have complex and/or multiple health conditions which increase the risk of severe COVID-19
  • Certain people are recommended to have for a fourth dose 3 months after the third (booster) dose:
    • People aged 50 years and over
    • Residents in aged or disability care facilities
    • People aged 16 years with severe immunocompromise
  • Certain people are eligible for a fourth dose 4 months after the third (booster) dose:
    • People aged 30 and over
  • Recommended to wait 3 months after a positive COVID test before receiving next COVID-19 vaccine dose
  • Next scheduled dose should be given as soon as possible after this period
  • Longer gap between infection and vaccination is likely to lead to a longer period of protection from reinfection
  • 8 weeks after first dose
  • Recommended to wait 3 months after a positive test for COVID-19 infection before receiving next COVID-19 vaccine dose
  • Next scheduled dose should be given as soon as possible after this period
  • Longer gap between infection and vaccination is likely to lead to a longer period of protection from reinfection

Where to get it

GP, or pharmacy

Age you can get vaccine

When you should get your second dose

Children aged 6-11 years

  • 8 weeks after first dose
  • Recommended to wait 3 months after confirmed a COVID-19 infection before receiving next COVID-19 vaccine dose
  • Next scheduled dose should be given as soon as possible after this period
  • Longer gap between infection and vaccination is likely to lead to a longer period of protection from reinfection

When you can get a third (booster) dose

Where to get it

Third (booster) dose not recommended

Select pharmacies

Age you can get vaccine

When you should get your second dose

People aged 12 years and over

  • 8 weeks after first dose
  • Recommended to wait 3 months after confirmed a COVID-19 infection before receiving next COVID-19 vaccine dose
  • Next scheduled dose should be given as soon as possible after this period
  • Longer gap between infection and vaccination is likely to lead to better immune response and longer protection from reinfection

When you can get a third (booster) dose

Where to get it

  • Certain people are recommended to have for a fourth dose 3 months after the third (booster) dose:
    • People aged 50years and over
    • Residents in aged or disability care facilities
    • People aged 16 years with severe immunocompromise
  • Certain people are eligible for a fourth dose 4 months after the third (booster) dose:
    • People aged 30 and over
  • Recommended to wait 3 months after a positive COVID test before receiving next COVID-19 vaccine dose
  • Next scheduled dose should be given as soon as possible after this period
  • Longer gap between infection and vaccination is likely to lead to a longer period of protection from reinfection

Pharmacy

Age you can get vaccine

People aged 18 years and over

When you can get a third (booster) dose

Where to get it

Only approved for use as a booster vaccine (3rd or 4th dose)

  • Recommended to wait 3 months after a positive COVID test before receiving next COVID-19 vaccine dose
  • Next scheduled dose should be given as soon as possible after this period
  • Longer gap between infection and vaccination is likely to lead to a longer period of protection from reinfection
  • Vaccine is authorised as booster for people 18 and older

Pharmacy or GP practice from mid-October 2022

Age you can get vaccine

When you should get your second dose

Children 6 months to under 5 years with the following or similar conditions:

  • Severe primary or secondary immunodeficiency, including those undergoing treatment for cancer, or on immunosuppressive treatments
  • Bone marrow or stem cell transplant or chimeric antigen T-cell (CAR-T) therapy
  • Complex congenital cardiac disease
  • Structural airway anomalies or chronic lung disease
  • Type 1 diabetes mellitus
  • Chronic neurological or neuromuscular conditions
  • A disability that requires frequent assistance with activities of daily living, such as severe cerebral palsy or Down Syndrome (Trisomy 21)
  • 8 weeks after first dose
  • Recommended to wait 3 months after a confirmed COVID-19 infection before receiving next COVID-19 vaccine dose
  • Immunocompromised children are recommended to have a third primary dose after the 2nd dose

Where to get it

GP or Paediatric Specialist Immunisation Service at the Royal Hobart Hospital

Age you can get vaccine

When you should get your second dose

People aged 60 years and over

  • 12 weeks after first dose
  • Recommended to wait 3 months after a confirmed COVID-19 infection before receiving next COVID-19 vaccine dose
  • Next scheduled dose should be given as soon as possible after this period
  • Longer gap between infection and vaccination is likely to lead to better immune response and longer protection from reinfection

When you can get a third (booster) dose

Where to get it

  • Only for 18+
  • 3 months after second dose
  • No longer recommended as a third (booster) dose unless no other suitable vaccine brand available - discuss with your GP or pharmacist
  • Recommended to wait 3 months after a confirmed COVID-19 infection before receiving next COVID-19 vaccine dose
  • Next scheduled dose should be given as soon as possible after this period
  • Longer gap between infection and vaccination is likely to lead to a longer period of protection from reinfection

GP or pharmacy

Aged you can get vaccine

When you should get your second dose

People aged 12 years and over

  • Three weeks after first dose
  • Recommended to wait 3 months after a positive COVID test before receiving next COVID-19 vaccine dose
  • Next scheduled dose should be given as soon as possible after this period

Longer gap between infection and vaccination is likely to lead to better immune response and longer protection from reinfection

When you can get a third (booster) dose

Where to get it
  • Only for 1+
  • 3 months after second dose
  • Can be used as a booster dose where Pfizer and Moderna are not suitable - discuss with your GP or pharmacist
  • Recommended to wait 3 months after a confirmed COVID-19 infection before receiving next COVID-19 vaccine dose
  • Next scheduled dose should be given as soon as possible after this period
  • Longer gap between infection and vaccination is likely to lead to a longer period of protection from reinfection
  • Vaccine not authorised as booster for adolescents aged 12-15 years
GP or pharmacy

Find out more about where to get a vaccine.

Find out more about where to get a vaccine.

Vaccines are safe and effective

Vaccines used in Australia must pass strict safety standards set by Australia's independent medicines regulator, the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA). The TGA rigorously monitors the safety of these vaccines.

Learn more about the safety of COVID-19 vaccines.

Proof of vaccination

You can access a free vaccination record or a COVID-19 digital certificate online via myGov through your Medicare or My Health Record account.

For step-by-step help to get your vaccination record or COVID-19 digital certificate, visit the Services Australia website. If you need more help or can’t get online, ring the Australian Immunisation Register on 1800 653 809.

For more information about accessing your immunisation history,visit Services Australia.

Reporting symptoms following vaccination

Reporting your symptoms after a vaccination helps ensure COVID-19 vaccines are delivered as safely as possible in Tasmania.

You can report your symptoms following vaccination to the Department of Health, Tasmania by calling the Public Health Hotline on 1800 671 738 or emailing a completed form (Word and PDF) to tas.aefi@health.tas.gov.au.

Contact your doctor or healthcare provider if you have severe symptoms, symptoms that are not going away after a few days, or you are otherwise concerned about side effects.



All vaccines approved for use in Australia protect against COVID-19, including severe illness and death from COVID-19. Like all vaccines, the COVID-19 vaccines work by training our immune systems to respond to a disease.

The virus that causes COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) is studded with spike proteins that it uses to enter human cells. COVID-19 vaccines present our immune system with a part of the virus, the spike protein, so that it is familiar with the virus and able to mount a strong immune response if it encounters the virus in the future.

You cannot get COVID-19 from the vaccine.

Further information on the development and testing process can be found at Australia’s vaccine agreements | Australian Government Department of Health. 

More information on the TGA batch assessment process can be found at Batch release assessment of COVID-19 vaccines | Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA).

The National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance (NCIRS) has developed two decision aids to help you make a decision about getting yourself and/or your children vaccinated.

  • Decision aid for adults (16+ years) has five simple steps, giving you information about the virus, the vaccine and the risks and benefits of getting vaccinated, helping you decide what is right for you
  • Decision aid for children (5-15 years) has information about the virus, the vaccine and the risks and benefits of getting vaccinated, helping you decide what is right for your child.

Yes. You can still spread the virus even after you’ve been vaccinated.

For more questions and answers, please see: COVID-19 vaccines – Is it true? | Australian Government Department of Health.

For more information about the Therapeutic Goods Administration’s vaccine approval process: TGA COVID vaccines

You can find information on COVID-19 vaccines in languages other than English on the Australian Government Department of Health’s website.

Other reputable information about vaccines is available from:

Australian Academy of Science 

World Health Organisation 

National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance 

Melbourne Vaccination Education Centre 

The National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance has a comprehensive frequently asked questions list, that you can check out if you have other questions not answered here.