About COVID-19 vaccines

Last Updated: 17 May 2022 10:18am

COVID-19 vaccines in Tasmania

Everyone living in Tasmania aged 5 years and over is eligible for a free COVID-19 vaccine.

Four vaccines are available in Tasmania.



Aged you can get vaccine When you should get your second dose
Children aged 5 to 11 years
  • 8 weeks after first dose
  • Recommended to wait 3 months after a confirmed COVID-19 infection before receiving next COVID-19 vaccine dose
  • Next scheduled dose should be given as soon as possible after this period
  • Longer gap between infection and vaccination is likely to lead to a longer period of protection from reinfection
When you can get a third (booster) doseWhere to get it

Third (booster) dose not approved

State-run clinic, GP or select pharmacies

Aged you can get vaccine When you should get your second dose
People aged 12 years and over
  • 8 weeks after first dose
  • Recommended to wait 3 months after a confirmed COVID-19 infection before receiving next COVID-19 vaccine dose
  • Next scheduled dose should be given as soon as possible after this period
  • Longer gap between infection and vaccination is likely to lead to a longer period of protection from reinfection
When you can get a third (booster) doseWhere to get it
  • Everyone 16+ is eligible for a third (booster) dose 3 months after their last dose
  • Certain people are eligible for a fourth (winter) dose 4 months after the third (booster) dose:
    • People aged 65 years and over
    • Residents in aged or disability care facilities under 65 years
    • People aged 16 years with severe immunocompromised
    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 50 years and over
  • Recommended to wait 3 months after a confirmed COVID-19 infection before receiving next COVID-19 vaccine dose
  • Next scheduled dose should be given as soon as possible after this period
  • Longer gap between infection and vaccination is likely to lead to a longer period of protection from reinfection
State-run clinic, GP, or pharmacy

Aged you can get vaccine When you should get your second dose
Children aged 6-11 years
  • 8 weeks after first dose
  • Recommended to wait 3 months after confirmed a COVID-19 infection before receiving next COVID-19 vaccine dose
  • Next scheduled dose should be given as soon as possible after this period
  • Longer gap between infection and vaccination is likely to lead to a longer period of protection from reinfection
When you can get a third (booster) doseWhere to get it

Third (booster) dose not approved

Select pharmacies

Aged you can get vaccine When you should get your second dose
People aged 12 years and over
  • 8 weeks after first dose
  • Recommended to wait 3 months after confirmed a COVID-19 infection before receiving next COVID-19 vaccine dose
  • Next scheduled dose should be given as soon as possible after this period
  • Longer gap between infection and vaccination is likely to lead to better immune response and longer protection from reinfection
When you can get a third (booster) doseWhere to get it
  • Everyone 16+ is eligible for a third (booster) dose 3 months after their last dose
  • Certain people are eligible for a fourth (winter) dose 4 months after first booster dose:
    • People aged 65 years and over
    • Residents in aged or disability care facilities under 65 years
    • People aged 16 years with severe immunocompromise
    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 50 years and over
  • Recommended to wait 3 months after confirmed a COVID-19 infection before receiving next COVID-19 vaccine dose
  • Next scheduled dose should be given as soon as possible after this period
  • Longer gap between infection and vaccination is likely to lead to a longer period of protection from reinfection
Pharmacy

Aged you can get vaccine When you should get your second dose
People aged 60 years and over
  • 12 weeks after first dose
  • Recommended to wait 3 months after a confirmed COVID-19 infection before receiving next COVID-19 vaccine dose
  • Next scheduled dose should be given as soon as possible after this period
  • Longer gap between infection and vaccination is likely to lead to better immune response and longer protection from reinfection
When you can get a third (booster) doseWhere to get it
  • Only for 18+
  • 3 months after second dose
  • No longer recommended as a third (booster) dose unless no other suitable vaccine brand available - discuss with your GP or pharmacist
  • Recommended to wait 3 months after a confirmed COVID-19 infection before receiving next COVID-19 vaccine dose
  • Next scheduled dose should be given as soon as possible after this period
  • Longer gap between infection and vaccination is likely to lead to a longer period of protection from reinfection
GP or pharmacy

Aged you can get vaccine When you should get your second dose
People aged 18 years and over
  • Three weeks after first dose
  • Recommended to wait 3 months after a confirmed COVID-19 infection before receiving next COVID-19 vaccine dose
  • Next scheduled dose should be given as soon as possible after this period
  • Longer gap between infection and vaccination is likely to lead to better immune response and longer protection from reinfection
When you can get a third (booster) doseWhere to get it
  • Only for 18+
  • 3 months after second dose
  • Can be used as a third (booster) for fourth (winter) dose where Pfizer and Moderna are not suitable - discuss with your GP or pharmacist
  • Recommended to wait 3 months after a confirmed COVID-19 infection before receiving next COVID-19 vaccine dose
  • Next scheduled dose should be given as soon as possible after this period
  • Longer gap between infection and vaccination is likely to lead to a longer period of protection from reinfection
GP or pharmacy

Find out more about where to get vaccinated by visiting Book Your Vaccine.

Vaccination status

The Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation (ATAGI) has stated a person aged 16 years and over:

  • should have a third (booster) dose three months after their second dose; or
  • who is immunocompromised, should have a booster after completing their primary vaccination course.

Both will be considered overdue if they have not had a booster shot within six months.

5 to 15 years

Children aged 5 to 15 years - are up to date with their COVID-19 vaccinations if they have received both dose 1 and 2. A third (booster) dose is not currently recommended in this age group.

Children aged 5 to 15 years who are immunocompromised - are up to date with their vaccination if they have received a third primary dose. An additional (booster) dose is not currently recommended in this age group.

Vaccines are safe and effective

Vaccines used in Australia must pass strict safety standards set by Australia's independent medicines regulator, the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA). The TGA rigorously monitors the safety of these vaccines.

Learn more about the safety of COVID-19 vaccines.

Proof of vaccination

You can access a free vaccination record or a COVID-19 digital certificate online via myGov through your Medicare or My Health Record account.

For step-by-step help to get your vaccination record or COVID-19 digital certificate, visit the Services Australia  website. If you need more help or can’t get online, ring the Australian Immunisation Register on 1800 653 809.

For more information about accessing your immunisation history or showing you've received the  vaccine through myGov, visit Services Australia.

Reporting symptoms following vaccination

Reporting your symptoms after a vaccination helps ensure COVID-19 vaccines are delivered as safely as possible in Tasmania.

You can report your symptoms following vaccination to the Department of Health, Tasmania by calling the Public Health Hotline on 1800 671 738 or emailing a completed form (Word and PDF) to tas.aefi@health.tas.gov.au.

Contact your doctor or healthcare provider if you have severe symptoms, symptoms that are not going away after a few days, or are otherwise concerned about side effects.



During the development and testing of COVID-19 vaccines safety has remained the top priority. Hundreds of millions of people are suffering from the ongoing social and economic devastation caused by the pandemic. The urgency of this crisis means that globally all available resources and efforts have been directed towards finding a safe and effective vaccine, and this includes in Australia.

In the past, the process of developing and licensing a vaccine has taken many years, but this has been shortened to within 12 months of the virus being discovered.

Some of the reasons for this rapid progress include:

Unprecedented funding and collaboration between vaccine developers and governments around the world. Significant financial investments were made, including building manufacturing facilities during the process of clinical trials, thereby speeding up the distribution process.

Technology has evolved, making vaccine development faster than in the past. Vaccine development requires understanding a virus’s genetic code. New technology enabled researchers to rapidly understand the genetic code of the COVID-19 virus. This allowed scientists around the world to start developing vaccines.

Clinical trials progress more quickly if a disease is widespread. Because so many people around the world have been sick with COVID-19, it has been easier to enrol people in trials and study the vaccine.

Importantly, COVID-19 vaccines must pass through the exact same rigor and phases of clinical trials as other vaccines and do not miss any important safety and quality checks along the way. Approval is only given if the vaccine works and meets the appropriate safety requirements.

In Australia, the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) ensures there is an independent quality assessment of every vaccine batch in Australia before vaccines can be distributed.

Further information on the development and testing process can be found at Australia’s vaccine agreements | Australian Government Department of Health.

More information on the TGA batch assessment process can be found at Batch release assessment of COVID-19 vaccines | Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA).

All vaccines approved for use in Australia protect against COVID-19, including severe illness and death from COVID-19. Like all vaccines, the COVID-19 vaccines work by training our immune systems to respond to a disease.

The virus that causes COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) is studded with spike proteins that it uses to enter human cells. COVID-19 vaccines present our immune system with a part of the virus, the spike protein, so that it is familiar with the virus and able to mount a strong immune response if it encounters the virus in the future.

You cannot get COVID-19 from the vaccine.

The National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance (NCIRS) has developed two decision aids to help you make a decision about getting yourself and/or your children vaccinated.

All viruses change or mutate. It is anticipated that the mRNA vaccines – including Pfizer (Comirnaty) and Moderna (Spikevax) – and AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria) vaccine will be effective against the newer strains or mutations of COVID-19.

This is because the vaccines work by inducing what is known as a "polyclonal" response – a collection of immunological responses to many different parts of the COVID "spike" protein. In the new strains or mutations, most of the spike protein stays the same and only a limited part of the spike protein is changed. So the vaccines should still work against the main, unchanged parts to the COVID-19 spike protein. Researchers are still investigating this and the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) is monitoring this as part of their vaccine approval and monitoring process.

If necessary, it is possible to slightly change the vaccine composition quickly to respond to new variants. This is done every year for the influenza vaccine to keep pace with the natural evolution of the circulating influenza virus.

People who have had COVID-19 can be vaccinated with a COVID-19 vaccine. Current advice is to wait three months after your confirmed COVID-19 infection before receiving your next COVID-19 vaccine. It is recommended that you still receive all of your COVID-19 vaccines.

This means if a patient tests positive for COVID-19 between their first and second doses, or between their second and booster dose, they should delay next dose for 3 months. The risk of re-infection with Omicron is very low within three months following infection.

Read the latest clinical advice for COVID-19 vaccination, including advice from the Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation (ATAGI).

Yes. You can still spread the virus even after you’ve been vaccinated.

For more questions and answers, please see: COVID-19 vaccines – Is it true? | Australian Government Department of Health.

For more information about Australia’s vaccine rollout program, visit: Australian Government Department of Health.

For more information about the Therapeutic Goods Administration’s vaccine approval process: TGA COVID vaccines

You can find information on COVID-19 vaccines in languages other than English on the Australian Government Department of Health’s website.

Other reputable information about vaccines is available from:

Australian Academy of Science

World Health Organisation 

National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance

Melbourne Vaccination Education Centre 

The National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance has a comprehensive frequently asked questions list, that you can check out if you have other questions not answered here.